The Alfa Bank/Trump Cabal to Destroy HRC’s Candidacy Exposed

Out there in some Domain Name Servers is a domain with the name {mail1.trump-email.com} (without the braces) and if you do a DNS lookup you will find its IP address is 66.216.133.29 which is shown to belong to Cendyn  a company that does e-mail marketing for 30,000 hotel clients.  The actual e-mail operation is outsourced to Listrak, which actually owns and operates the server.  In reality the actual hardware is located in a Data Center in Philadelphia, about a hundred miles from Trump Tower.

In June of 2007 Cendyn began providing its services to The Trump Organization:

Cendyn, the leader in interactive marketing for the hospitality industry,
has been selected as The Trump Organization’s exclusive interactive
marketing agency. Implementation of Cendyn’s products and services will
enhance The Trump Organization’s global online presence which includes
the website http://www.trump.com, along with more than 50 private label
websites for Trump owned properties and investments (real estate, golf
and hotel).

All rather routine, until 5:36 PM, October 31, 2016 when Franklin Foer published an article in Slate Was a Trump Server Communicating With Russia?   He cites “group of computer scientists” who speculate, based on analysis of ” nearly comprehensive logs of communication between servers”.  One of these scientist, code named Tea Leaves in the article, found “what looked like malware emanating from Russia. The destination domain had Trump in its name, which of course attracted Tea Leaves’ attention.  He and some cyber-security friends concluded:

The irregular pattern of server lookups actually resembled the pattern of human conversation—conversations that began during office hours in New York and continued during office hours in Moscow. It dawned on the researchers that this wasn’t an attack, but a sustained relationship between a server registered to the Trump Organization and two servers registered to an entity called Alfa Bank.

This may have been what Harry Reid was referencing in his October 30th letter to FBI James Comey:

ReidLetter

Asked what evidence exists of such a connection, Reid spokesman Adam Jentleson cited classified briefings.

“There have been classified briefings on this topic,” Jentleson said. “That is all I can say.”

Shortly after the Slate article, HRC posted, via Twitter (I assume the time stamp represents a different time zone rather than advanced knowledge):
HRCTweet

On November 1st the first debunking of the Slate story started appearing, via major sources (Forbes, NY Times, Snopes) and was followed by blogs of technology reporters and other computer scientists (Errata Security, Verge  , Vox and others) .

Slate followed up on November 2, discounting the arguments against the theory that something nefarious was taking place between the Cendyn server and Alfa bank.  Foer prefaced his response with:

Publication of my article was quickly followed by responses from the Trump campaign and Alfa Bank, both of which offered more detailed accounts of the server activity than they had provided when I’d asked them for comment. My piece also elicited a series of valuable objections and credible alternate theories from technology reporters and other computer scientists. I take these seriously and believe they also deserve public airing and exploration. Several of the critiques of the hypothesis offered by the experts in my piece offer simpler, more benign explanations for the server activity.

The Trump Campaign response:
TrumpReply

In his conclusion he acknowledges that it was reported that the FBI had investigated the server:

As the New York Times reported on Tuesday, after my story published, the FBI looked into the server activity but “ultimately concluded that there could be an innocuous explanation, like a marketing email or spam, for the computer contacts.”

But he persist in he belief in the nefarious activity:

Or maybe it’s less than innocent, as the computer scientists suggested and still believe. (I’ve checked back with eight of the nine computer scientists and engineers I consulted for my original story, and they all stood by their fundamental analysis. One of them couldn’t be reached.) I concluded my account of these scientists’ search for answers by arguing that the servers and their activity deserved further explanation. Hopefully my story and the debate that has followed will move us closer to a fuller understanding.

 

 

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